Team Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda

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Cigar Details: Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda

  • Vitola: Corona Gorda
  • Length: 4″
  • Ring Gauge: 46
  • Country of Origin: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Habano
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Filler: Nicaragua, Peru and Costa Rica
  • Factory: Tabacos de Costa Rica
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $9.25
  • Release Date: August 2020
  • Source: Developing Palates via Lake Country Cigars

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper on the Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda is between light and medium brown and the color is a bit darker towards the foot and lighter towards the head. There are a couple of slightly raised veins present while the seams are very smooth but visible due to the color variation. I’m guessing that there are three caps as what I think is the second cap only goes around the head about 80% of the way. The band is simple but elegant as it’s primarily an egg shell like white with texture with a red M and a gold circle around it. The aroma from the wrapper is a light fire cured/pipe tobacco note while the foot brings a little fuller version of the same along with some beef jerky. The pre-light draw brings airy cedar with a light fire cured accent.

Pre-light Experience

The Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda is lovely in hand. The wrapper is oily and sports this dark Colorado coloring. There are few veins present and those present are medium in size. It is well constructed and it is giving off aromas of cedar, tobacco, cherries and earth.

Pre-light Experience

The Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda has a silky smooth chocolate brown wrapper, with a soft square press shape. The aroma catches me off guard with somewhat intense peat, moss and herbal notes. Not at all what I was expecting. I’d describe it as a barnyard, perique, mossy combination. From the foot, aromas of syrupy sweetness.

Pre-light Experience

The Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda has a fine grit sandpaper, even colored, Colorado Claro wrapper shade. Veins are well pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even and head well wrapped. Aromas from the wrapper give campfire and cedar. Aromas from the foot give sweet prunes and cedar. Cold draw reveals dried nuts and faint red pepper spice.

First Third

The cigar begins with a mix of aged wood and mustiness. At a quarter inch in, a faint black pepper joins. At a half inch in, the black pepper is very faint. The retrohale is musty, aged wood with a light black pepper zing at the end. As the third comes to a close, some smokiness joins the profile. The strength in this third was right at medium.

First Third

The first third opens up by delivering this lovely spice flavor profile of baking spice qualities with cinnamon and anise. I am picking up some cedar notes as well and with that is a creamy and cherry finish. In terms of strength and body, it is smoking at a medium level.

First Third

Graham cracker and cedar open the first third with mild toasted earth coming through after a few puffs. Mild baking spices lingering on the post draw. That herbal component from the aroma joins in as the cigar settles, with dry cedar in the mid profile. By the bottom half of the first third, the toasted earth has fallen off completely.

First Third

The first third has a very buttery and oily texture to the smoke. Flavors of buttered bread, ripe prunes and hay. There’s no spice involved until I retrohale, which at that point gives a layered red pepper spice. The finish has a long and lingering silky oiliness and butter. Strength and body is medium.

Second Third

The second third is a continuation of the first as the aged wood and mustiness remain up front with light black pepper and smokiness in the background. At a half inch in, a light, dry earth joins the profile as the black pepper picks up a bit and the smokiness has departed. At an inch in, the dry earth is now even with the aged wood and mustiness. The retrohale is now musty, aged wood and dry earth. At an inch and a half in, some smokiness returns. The third wraps up with the dry earth, mustiness and aged wood up front with light black pepper in the background as the smokiness has left once again. The strength remains at medium.

Second Third

The second third delivers a flavor profile that focuses on cream, cedar and cherries. There are some tobacco and earth notes, and the finish is that of baking spices with touches of cinnamon and pepper. Like before, the cigar is medium in strength and body.

Second Third

The second third combines sweet herbal notes, graham cracker and a cedar finish lingering well into the post draw. By the halfway point, the profile is very subtle with some hay influences.

Second Third

The second third creates a pretty major transition. The buttery and oily notes are replaced by a mixture of subtle red pepper spice and cedar. This is most evident on the finish. There’s also a dryness in wood through retrohaling but it also delivers sweet prunes. Strength and body remains medium.

Final Third

As the final third begins, a slight char joins the wood. At a half inch in, the char has increased a fair amount as the black pepper has left the profile. The retrohale is musty and slightly charred wood and dry earth. The cigar wraps up with the charred wood having a slight lead over the dry earth and mustiness. The strength in this third bumped up to slightly above medium.

Final Third

The final third delivers a flavor profile of black pepper with rich earth and damp wood. There are some metallic flavors present as well, and there is a touch of coffee and cream on the finish. Like before, the cigar is smoking at a medium level in strength and body.

Final Third

Slightly tannic cedar comes through in the last third, with mild herbal notes in the middle of the profile, finishing with tannic cedar. There are no other flavor evolutions through the remainder of the review.

Final Third

The complexity of the final third turns it down a notch such that it is now mainly dry cedar, baking spices and stale red pepper spice. Strength and body finishes the same at medium.

Burn

The burn was a bit wavy at times, but always self corrected. The ash held on in one inch increments.

Burn

Burn was amazing from beginning to end. Great construction.

Burn

The burn was razor straight through the review, with the ash consistently dropping as it reached a one inch point.

Burn

Perfect burn performance was great. Even, solid ash marks and cool burning temperature.

Draw

The draw was fairly snug throughout.

Overall

The aged wood and mustiness provided a nice start, but once the dry earth joined in, it took things down a notch and then the char building up took things down another notch. The Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda had a nice aged profile to begin, which I was enjoying, but things kind of just degraded from there. I know that this is a blend they had been working on for some time, but in the end, it’s just not something that really worked for me. I don’t see myself returning to this one.

Draw

Beautiful draw from beginning to end. Wonderfully made cigar.

Overall

The Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda was a solid cigar. I thought it produced a good flavor profile that was present throughout and even showing some transitioning as well. I enjoyed the cedar, cherries and earth notes in the first two thirds, and the construction and draw were perfect throughout. This is a factory that Crowned Heads is having success at in my opinion, and is a factory they should work with more down the road.

Draw

The draw had some resistance to it, roughly 2 to 2-1/2 notches into the resistant spectrum.

Overall

The Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda was not like any other Crowned Heads I’ve smoked in the past. It brought a unique combination of graham cracker and herbal notes, all well balanced under the medium strength mark. Construction was amazing, with the draw having some resistance to it. Total smoking time was 1 hour and 33 minutes. This isn’t a cigar I would reach for all the time, but given the interesting and unique combination of flavors, I would smoke this when I was looking for a change of pace.

Draw

The draw was also perfect, giving the ideal air flow.

Overall

A tale of two cigar experiences. Between about the first half and second half of the cigar, it felt like I was smoking two entirely different cigars. The first half was awesome, giving a velvety and oily texture with notes of buttered bread, ripe prunes and hay. Right around the second half, the cigar lost all the buttery aspects and instead turned into dry cedar, baking spices and stale red pepper spice. I don’t think I’ve smoked a cigar with such a split personality. Although I rated it overall average, I’d like to come back this cigar in a few months to see if I still feel the same.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
Good
GoodFirst
Third
GoodFirst
Third
GoodFirst
Third
Good
AverageSecond
Third
AverageSecond
Third
GoodSecond
Third
Good
SubparFinal
Third
AverageFinal
Third
AverageFinal
Third
Subpar
Very GoodBurnAmazingBurnAmazingBurnAmazing
GoodDrawAmazingDrawGoodDrawAmazing
GoodOverallAverageOverallGoodOverallGood

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

5.35

Cost/Point

$1.73

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

6.10

Cost/Point

$1.52

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

6.52

Cost/Point

$1.42

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

6.10

Cost/Point

$1.52

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda
John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Mil Días Corona Gorda

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