Team Cigar Review: Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

No comments

Cigar Details: Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

  • Vitola: Toro
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Mexico
  • Wrapper: Mexico
  • Binder: Mexico
  • Filler: Mexico
  • Factory: Turrent
  • Blender: Alejandro Turrent
  • Price: $11.22
  • Release Date: February 2024
  • Source: Developing Palates via Corona Cigar Co.

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

Aaron: The wrapper on the Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro is medium brown and has some decently raised veins present along with a network of finer ones. The seams are a bit raised while the caps are well applied. The band is white, green and gold and denotes the brand and line names. The aroma from the wrapper is dry earth and light wood while the foot brings a mix of sweet cedar and bread. The pre-light draw is a mix of cedar and graham cracker along with a mid-level spiciness on my lips.
Seth: It’s pretty cool to know that I am smoking The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar. Nice looking cigar with a Colorado color to the wrapper. The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro had small to medium sized veins throughout. Slightly oily and leather like texture. Nothing wowing, but solid and consistent. Years ago, I would say it is crazy to see such a light Mexican wrapper, but it’s not 2010 anymore. Aromas of cherries, cocoa, earth and tobacco.
John: The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro comes in cellophane and has a UPC sticker with the cigar information which tears in half when opened. I’m impressed with the updated band design which is black lettering on white and green with a bottom section in black on silver indicating ‘The Original San Andres Valley Cigar’. I weighed the cigar at 18.4 grams and measured the humidity, with the HumidiMeter Pro, at 71.1%. Aromas from the wrapper included sweet tobacco with a strawberry sweetness, and syrup with hints of raisin underpinning everything. Out of the foot, I was smelling similar aromas along with some hay.
Jiunn: The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro has a uniform and oily Colorado wrapper shade. Veins are well pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even and the head is well wrapped and capped. Pre-light aromas provide a plethora of funky barnyard and creamy roasted nuts.

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

First Third

Aaron: The cigar begins with a lot of earth along with some minerality and toasted oak. At a half inch in, the earth and oak meet in the middle and are now even along with some light minerality. The retrohale is an even mix of earth and toasted oak. At an inch and a half in, the earth takes a decent lead in the profile again and the minerality increases a bit. As the third comes to a close, the earth has a bit of a lead over the toasted oak, with the minerality not too far behind. The strength was slightly below medium.
Seth: The first third starts out with a solid earth and wood profile. Some leather like qualities present as well, tobacco and spices too, but overall earth and wood focus. Some cocoa and coffee notes. Medium in strength and body.
John: Sweet wood opens the first third with tobacco sweetness immediately on the retrohale finishing with hay. As the first third settles in, lingering tobacco sweetness teams up with wood on the post draw. By the inch mark, a medium minus strength spice quietly moves into the post draw. The profile remains consistent for the remainder of the first third.
Jiunn: The first third has a mixture of roasted nuts, cedar and a fine dirt grittiness to the profile. Retrohaling deepens the roasted nuts as well as brings a dried red pepper spice. The finish is long with an overlay of cedar bitterness. Strength and body is medium.

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Second Third

Aaron: As the second third begins, the earth increases its lead over the toasted oak. The retrohale remains an even mix of earth and toasted oak. At an inch in, the toast level on the oak increases a bit. As the third comes to a close, the earth has a pretty decent lead over the toasted oak with some minerality not far behind the oak. The strength bumped up to medium.
Seth: The second third continues to deliver that earth, wood and tobacco profile. Bits of leather and cocoa notes, but nothing prominent. Medium in strength and body.
John: The second third opens with lingering, dry wood at medium strength through the post draw. Medium spices are present on the retrohale. As the second third settles in, sweet tobacco joins the spices on the retrohale and provides balance. The profile has settled into creamy, sweet spice on the retrohale by the halfway point.
Jiunn: The second third’s flavor profile tastes inconsistent. At certain points, there is lessening of the cedar bitterness (which actually plagued the first third). But at other points, the bitterness spikes up. When it does, the other (better) flavors gets diminished. Strength and body remains medium.

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Final Third

Aaron: As the final third begins, the toast level increases a bit more. At a half inch in, the toasted oak increases in fullness to now being right behind the earth. The retrohale remains an even mix of earth and toasted oak. At an inch in, the earth and toasted oak are now even up front. At an inch and a quarter, the toast level becomes pretty heavy and a light wood bitterness becomes present. As the cigar wraps up, the earth and heavily toasted oak are even up front, with some minerality a bit behind and light wood bitterness in the background. The strength remained at medium.
Seth: The final third is really in line with that of the second. More mineral notes in this third, but overall still earth, wood and tobacco focused. Some leather, coffee and cocoa. Medium to medium-full in strength and body.
John: Creamy spices start the last third with spices and wood together into the post draw. As the final third settles in, medium strength earth also joins the post draw. Some time later, bready notes are present on the retrohale at light plus.
Jiunn: The final third tastes more consistent to the first third such that the underlying cedar bitterness returns. It weighs pretty heavy on the palate so the other flavors unfortunately get diminished quite a bit. Strength and body remains medium.

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Burn

Aaron: The burn was a bit wavy at times, but never needed any intervention. The ash held on in inch and a quarter increments.
Seth: Good burn throughout.
John: The burn was straight through the entire review.
Jiunn: Burn performance was perfect. Even burn, ample smoke production, tight ashes and cool burning temperature.

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Draw

Aaron: The draw was perfect, with just the right amount of resistance that I prefer.
Seth: Very nice draw from start to finish.
John: The draw was somewhat into the resistant spectrum, roughly 2-1/2 to 3 notches.
Jiunn: Draw performance was on point, providing the ideal balance between air flow and resistance.

Overall

Aaron: The cigar began with a lot of earth along with some minerality and toasted oak. The earth and oak became even a half inch in, and then the earth took a decent lead again. The profile remained the same until the final third when the earth and oak became even again and a light wood bitterness joined in. The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro had an average flavor profile throughout. There were some changes to the fullness of the components, but no other transitions. It was nice to smoke this latest iteration from the brand, but I don’t see it as something I’d really return to.
Seth: We need to relax with the Mexican puros being released to the market. There are not a plethora of them, heck there may be less than five, but there are too many. The Turrent Family needs to tell people to stop, or just handle themselves for the sake of all cigar smokers. The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro was very lacking and one dimensional. Bad example of Mexican tobacco. There have been blends where Mexican tobacco is not the main component and it has popped and delivered more in that experience. Sad.
John: The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro provides a respectable update to the Te Amo brand. I found the first third delivered the most interesting and engaging flavor combinations, with the second third still being pleasant but not as dynamic. The last third was too linear for my taste. The burn was perfect while the draw had some resistance to it. While the Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro didn’t do quite enough for me to want to return to it, I do think it’s an improvement over the original series. It’s worth while for those who have only smoked the original to try it out for themselves and see how it stacks up. Total smoking time was a value forward 2 hours and 42 minutes.
Jiunn: It’s not very often to smoke a cigar in which all the leaves come from the same country. Although it’s unique, it doesn’t match up to my palate. The Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro had an underlying and overlaying cedar bitterness that I couldn’t get past. This note was lasting and masked the other favorable flavors. Although unique, I will pass on this.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
AveragePre
Light
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
Good
AverageFirst
Third
AverageFirst
Third
GoodFirst
Third
Average
AverageSecond
Third
AverageSecond
Third
AverageSecond
Third
Average
AverageFinal
Third
AverageFinal
Third
AverageFinal
Third
Average
Very GoodBurnGoodBurnAmazingBurnAmazing
AmazingDrawVery GoodDrawGoodDrawAmazing
AverageOverallAverageOverallAverageOverallAverage

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

5.65

Cost/Point

$1.99

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

5.40

Cost/Point

$2.08

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

5.80

Cost/Point

$1.93

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

5.75

Cost/Point

$1.95

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: Te Amo The Original San Andrés Valley Cigar Toro

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *