Team Cigar Review: MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro

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Cigar Details: MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro

  • Vitola: Toro Extra
  • Length: 6.5″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Habano
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Filler: Nicaragua
  • Factory: La Zona
  • Blender: Hector Alfonso
  • Price: $9.50
  • Release Date: August 2020
  • Source: MoyaRuiz

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The oval pressed MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro has a shade of brown between light and medium with a network of fine, some slightly raised, veins. The seams are smooth and well blended while the head is finished off with a well applied set of caps. The band has gold, cream and dark green with the line name up top and the sub line down below. The aroma from the wrapper is a light mix of wood and tobacco sweetness while the foot reminds me of spice cake. The pre-light draw brings a butter rum flavor along with a mild spice, but there is a mid level spiciness present on my lips.

Pre-light Experience

Softly pressed, the MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro is finished with a wrapper that is lovely in coloring. It is silky in texture, and has an antique reddish brown coloring. True Colorado. There are few veins throughout and they are medium to large in size. The cigar itself has an aroma of earth, tobacco, black pepper, red pepper and earth.

Pre-light Experience

The MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro has a relatively sharp box press, with no UPC sticker or brand identifier on the cellophane. Aromas from the cigar included sweet baking spices and bread. From the foot, some sweet plum and tobacco.

Pre-light Experience

The MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro has a uniform cafe wrapper. Veins are well pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even and head well wrapped. Aromas from the wrapper give prunes, hay and cedar. Aromas from the foot give white pepper and apricots. Cold draw reveals cedar shavings and prunes.

First Third

The cigar begins with a mix of wood and cinnamon. At a half inch in, the cinnamon has morphed into a more intense baking spice as some light mustiness has joined as well. The retrohale is slightly musty oak with a mild baking spice. At an inch and a half in, some meatiness joins the profile and the smoke is very chewy. The third wraps up with an even mix of wood, mustiness and baking spice as the meatiness is light in the background. The strength was slightly above medium.

First Third

The first third opens up with a lot of dry earth and dark pepper notes. I am getting black and red pepper. As it progresses though, it dials it back some and I begin to get herbal, mineral and grass notes. There is still pepper present, but not like before. In terms of strength and body, the cigar is smoking at a full level.

First Third

My first few puffs bring cedar, faint baking spices and a woody post draw. Sweet wood moves into the middle of the profile quickly. Mild dryness joins the post draw shortly after. Spices on the retrohale are quickly building in strength as the cigar progresses. Mild cocoa joins the center by the 15 minute mark. There are no other notable flavor changes for the rest of the first third.

First Third

The first third creates a familiar La Zona style red pepper spice pop. With the spice is also a meatiness to the cigar, oak bitterness and baking spices. Retrohaling does a good job of highlighting the red pepper spice. The finish consists of oak bitterness and trailing softer red pepper spice. Strength and body is overall medium.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the baking spice has transitioned to a bolder black pepper and has a very long finish. At a half inch in, the meatiness departs and some earth joins in. The retrohale remains musty oak, but now with a fair amount of black pepper. As the third comes to a close, the musty wood and earth are even up front with the black pepper a bit behind. The strength remained at slightly above medium.

Second Third

The second third delivers a flavor profile that is dominated by peppery spices. I am picking up some metallic and earth qualities as well, and there are touches of wood and black coffee on the finish. Like the first third, the cigar is full in strength and body.

Second Third

Wood and light plus strength baking spices take the profile into the second third. Baking spices are up to medium strength on the post draw. Approaching the halfway point, the profile remains consistent. Baking spices fall off in intensity in the bottom half.

Second Third

The second third dials the complexities down such that it’s just mainly baking spices, cedar and increased oak bitterness. The finish is muddled with a glob of cedar and oak bitterness. Strength increases to medium-full while the body remains medium.

Final Third

The final third begins with all of the components even. At a half inch in, a heavy char joins the profile. The retrohale is now slight charred and musty wood, earth and light black pepper. The cigar wraps up with heavily charred wood, mustiness and earth with light black pepper. The strength in this third bumped up to medium-full.

Final Third

The final third delivers a flavor profile that is focused on peppery spices, seasoned wood, dry earth and mineral qualities. There is a metallic flavor profile on the finish that adds a sharpness and is paired with the pepper notes. Like before, full in strength and body.

Final Third

Toasted cedar and earth, with a wood finish lead the last third. That toasted cedar drives the profile as the last third settles in. As the cigar progresses, the toasted character fades, replaced with primarily wood. There are no other change ups for the remainder of the review.

Final Third

Nothing new to discuss for the final third. Baking spices, cedar and oak bitterness with a muddled finish. At times there’s a little cream and baking spices on the finish but it’s not consistent. Strength and body finishes the same medium-full and medium.

Burn

The burn was a mess as the cigar seemed to want to go out on every draw, so I would take multiple draws to try to get full smoke production. A re-light was necessary in each third with the second third developing a major canoe.

Burn

Nice burn line throughout. It was never perfect, but it corrected itself and smoked well. Well made cigar.

Burn

The burn was straight out of the gate, with the ash holding on up to 1-1/2 inches. While puffing away, the cigar went out at the halfway point, requiring a re-light. The burn is uneven in the last third.

Burn

Incredibly disappointed with the burn performance. Starting from around the second third, the cigar went out so many times that I lost count. It seemed like every time I re-lit, the cigar went out. If it hadn’t been a review cigar, I would have ditched the cigar.

Draw

The draw was slightly tighter than I prefer but didn’t seem to cause any issues with the smoking experience.

Overall

With how bad the burn was, I’m a bit surprised the cigar was able to carve out a serviceable flavor experience. The first third was good and had an enjoyable flavor combination, but it dropped down in each third as the burn issues just took their toll. I’m hoping the other guys had better construction and can better report on the flavor profile as with how the first third was, I’m curious how a normally burning version would score. I’ll have to take a wait and see on this MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro to determine if it’s worth a revisit.

Draw

Very good draw from beginning to end. Well constructed.

Overall

This is a strong blend, and it is no surprise. La Jugada Habano is a strong offering. I do like the pressing of the cigar, but I am not crazy on the blend itself. I have never been one to go after a La Jugada Habano if I am looking for something to smoke, but if my options are restricted to the line I would go with the press. A nice addition to the line, but a line that is lacking complexity and depth. There is a core flavor profile, but it is not strong enough to make the MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro pop and excel.

Draw

The draw was at most 1/2 to 1 notch towards the resistant spectrum, putting it well in the range for an ideal draw.

Overall

The MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro was an overall pleasant smoking experience that remained consistent from start to finish. When I saw the Habano, I was expecting a bit more pop to the spices. None of the thirds really grabbed me in terms of complexity or layers of flavor, so I was left with an enjoyable, but average impression. Construction was great, with an ideal draw and a single re-light required. Total smoking time was a respectable 1 hour and 51 minutes.

Draw

The draw on the other hand was flawless, giving the ideal air flow.

Overall

Average and mundane tasting experience coupled with an atrocious burn. Past the first third, the MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro didn’t capture my attention very much. Especially for such a large sized cigar and long smoking time, it needs to keep the smoker engaged for the long haul ride. I’ll put this in the pass list.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
Very GoodPre
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GoodFirst
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AverageFirst
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AverageSecond
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SubparFinal
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Aaron Loomis

SCORE

4.63

Cost/Point

$2.05

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

5.50

Cost/Point

$1.73

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

5.55

Cost/Point

$1.71

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

5.25

Cost/Point

$1.81

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro
John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: MoyaRuiz La Jugada Habano Semi-Pressed Toro

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