Team Cigar Review: J.C. Newman The American No. 2

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Cigar Details: J.C. Newman The American No. 2

  • Vitola: Toro Extra
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 54
  • Country of Origin: United States
  • Wrapper: Florida Sun Grown
  • Binder: Connecticut Broadleaf
  • Filler: Pennsylvania and Connecticut Habano
  • Factory: El Reloj
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $18.50
  • Release Date: May 2019
  • Source: J.C. Newman

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper on the J.C. Newman The American No. 2 is medium brown with some darker marbling present. There are a few slightly raised veins and while the seams are smooth, they are easily visible in some spots due to the color variation of the wrapper. The head is finished off with a well applied triple cap. The band is a coat of arms style and carries the line name on the front with the company name and the factory location on the sides of the band. The aroma from the wrapper is a mix of wood and sweet prune. The foot brings sweet wood and white pepper. The pre-light draw brings a mix of wood, bread and hay with a mild spiciness on my lips.

Pre-light Experience

The band design of the J.C. Newman The American No. 2 seems to take inspiration from the Presidential seal. There are complex elements of the American flag, an eagle, the flag of Puerto Rico, along with text saying Tampa, Fla and J.C. Newman. The band is outlined in metallic gold with colors of red, white and blue throughout. Nosing the wrapper, I’m able to pick up aged wood, light leather, some citrus and sweetness. In the foot, there is stewed raisin and tobacco. The vitola is officially listed as a No. 2 at 6 inches by 54 ring gauge. As number schemes for vitolas vary across brands, I consider the vitola name to be JMSG approved.

Pre-light Experience

The J.C. Newman The American No. 2 has an espresso brown wrapper shade with various splashes of darker brown throughout. The roll is a bit lumpy, veins well pressed, seams tight and head finished off with a well wrapped cap. Aromas from the wrapper gives rich cedar and dry barnyard. Nosing the foot gives cedar, raisins and white pepper. Cold draw gives cedar, raisins and hay.

First Third

The cigar begins with a mix of wood and cinnamon. At a half inch in, some cream joins the profile. At an inch in, the creaminess has morphed into orange pith. The retrohale carries a slightly smoother version of the same wood, cinnamon and orange pith profile. At an inch and a half, some earthiness has joined the profile. As the third comes to a close, some mustiness joins in with the wood, orange pith and earth while the cinnamon is fairly faint in the background. The strength was slightly below medium.

First Third

The first third opens with cocoa and cedar, the cedar carrying a dry mouthfeel into the post draw. On the retrohale, the cedar has a nice creaminess and a clean finish. In the middle of the profile, citrus begins to develop along with leather on the post draw. That leather begins to linger for a significant time between draws. Some minor stewed raisin joins the retrohale, as the creaminess from the retrohale pushes into the main draw. I found the first third to be quite pleasant. I wouldn’t describe it as overly complex but the flavors are enjoyable and balanced well against each other.

First Third

The first third’s flavor profile is medium bodied and strength delivery of wood and spice. Flavors of bitter cedar, baking spices and anise dominates the profile with softer notes of subdued nuts and bread following on the finish. Retrohaling gives more of the baking spices and cedar.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the earthiness and orange pith are in the lead with the wood slightly behind. The cinnamon is no longer detectable. At a half inch in, the orange pith turns into a mustiness. At an inch in, a floral perfume note joins the profile. The retrohale is wood, mustiness and some of the light floral perfume. As the third comes to a close, the wood and mustiness are up front with a little bit of earth in the background. The floral perfume has left the profile. The strength in this third bumped up to medium.

Second Third

The flavor profile changes to a cedar forward profile, with accents of citrus. On the retrohale, I pick up an earthy cedar combination, with spices to chase. The earthiness beings to take over the profile as the second third settles in. That earth intensity eventually falls, with the cedar essentially defining the second third. In the bottom half, the citrus has more strength but no other flavors are present. I found the second third to be a step down in terms of flavors present. None of the flavors were unbalanced, but there wasn’t enough going on here to rate above average.

Second Third

The second third continues the trend of bitter cedar, baking spices and anise notes. If anything, there is a greater spiciness in baking spices. Strength moves to medium-full (body staying medium).

Final Third

As the final third begins, it continues on with the musty wood and light earth. At a half inch in, a slight floral note returns to the profile. The retrohale is carrying the musty wood and floral note. At an inch and a quarter, the cigar begins to warm up, bringing some mintiness to the profile. The cigar wraps up with this same profile. The strength in this third bumped up to slightly above medium.

Final Third

That cedar from the second third begins to linger the entire time between draws here. On the retrohale, the cedar has some sweetness to build off. Some earthiness returns to join the cedar on the retrohale, but much more subdued than the second third. The post draw cedar eventually takes on a drying aspect as the cigar settles. Some hay is present minutes later. The final third was very similar to the second third, lacking enough flavors to rate it above average for me.

Final Third

Finishing up to the last third, the profile is basically the same bitter cedar, heavy handed baking spices and anise. There is also a build up of a generic burning paper type of note. Further, the baking spices plays a pretty big part in the finish now as it’s starting to trickle towards the back of my throat. Strength and body finishes medium plus and medium, respectively.

Burn

The burn was a bit of a struggle. It was wavy the whole way and required two touch-ups and also went out twice requiring re-lights. The cigar did burn quite slow giving a long smoking time. The ash held on in inch and a quarter increments.

Burn

The burn was slightly off by the halfway point of the first third, eventually requiring a touch-up. The burn again was uneven in the second third, requiring another touch-up. As the cigar reached the mid point, a third touch-up was required.

Burn

The burn was overall good but not without faults. The ashes were fairly flaky, and a few touch-ups were required. Other than that, no issues.

Draw

The draw was slightly tighter than I prefer, but it didn’t cause any issues with the smoking experience.

Overall

The cigar started with a nice combination of wood, cinnamon and orange pith, reminding me quite a bit of the Drew Estate FSG line. It moved on to musty wood with a floral note as it progressed. The burn was an issue throughout. The J.C. Newman The American No. 2 is a pretty anticipated cigar and I felt it gave a good showing. Burn issues aside, I enjoyed it and would definitely smoke it again. The price point is fairly high, but can be expected with an all U.S.A. build. The smoking time was quite lengthy, so it does provide some value there.

Draw

The draw was absolutely dead center in the perfect region of resistance.

Overall

The J.C. Newman The American No. 2 was balanced, and medium strength overall. I’ve been looking forward to trying this cigar for some time, but other than the first third I didn’t find the flavors grabbing my attention at any point. I would have liked to see more intensity from tobaccos from Connecticut or Pennsylvania that really showcase a broad range of what American tobacco can offer. The cigar had a great smoking time of 2 hours and 3 minutes, with a nice cool burn.

Draw

The draw was perfect, giving the best air flow possible.

Overall

Smoking through the J.C. Newman The American No. 2, I definitely felt a sense of patriotism, but more importantly, the focus was on the overall delivery of flavors. In terms of that, it fell a bit short especially at the understandable higher price point of $18.50. I felt the profile was not balanced at all, giving too much wood and spice without anything to really bridge those heavier flavors. Glad I had the opportunity to smoke this but wouldn’t reach for it again anytime soon.

Aaron
John
Jiunn
GoodPre
Light
Very GoodPre
Light
Good
GoodFirst
Third
GoodFirst
Third
Average
GoodSecond
Third
AverageSecond
Third
Average
AverageFinal
Third
AverageFinal
Third
Subpar
SubparBurnGoodBurnGood
Very GoodDrawAmazingDrawAmazing
GoodOverallAverageOverallAverage

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

6.27

Cost/Point

$2.95

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

5.90

Cost/Point

$3.14

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

5.20

Cost/Point

$3.56

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: J.C. Newman The American No. 2
Aaron LoomisTeam Cigar Review: J.C. Newman The American No. 2

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