Team Cigar Review: Henry Clay War Hawk Toro

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Cigar Details: Henry Clay War Hawk Toro

  • Vitola: Toro
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 50
  • Country of Origin: Honduras
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Connecticut
  • Binder: Connecticut Broadleaf
  • Filler: Honduras
  • Factory: Flor de Copan
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $8.00
  • Release Date: March 2019
  • Source: Altadis U.S.A.

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper on the Henry Clay War Hawk Toro is light golden brown and has a couple of slightly raised veins present. The seams are visible as they are slightly raised while the head is finished off with a well applied double cap. There are two bands with the first being the traditional design for the brand while the secondary strip band is gold with black letters and borders and designates the line. The aroma from the wrapper is full on dry hay and barnyard funk while the foot brings light wood and stone fruit sweetness. The pre-light draw brings a nice mix of cedar and leather.

Pre-light Experience

The Henry Clay War Hawk Toro has a standard, run of the mill claro Equadorian Connecticut shade wrapper. The touch is velvety and fairly oily. Major veins are well pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even and head finished off with a well applied deep cap. Aromas from the wrapper bring wet grass and light cedar. Aromas from the foot tell black pepper and rich roasted nuttiness. Cold draw gives faint cedar and hay.

First Third

The cigar begins with toasted wood and a mild baking spice. At a quarter inch in, some black pepper mixes in with the baking spice. At an inch in, the toasted wood remains up front as the baking spice/black pepper has mellowed slightly but has a long finish. The retrohale brings a fuller version of the same profile. As the third comes to a close, a slight char has joined the toasted wood while the baking spice/pepper mixture is still in the background. The strength in this third was slightly below medium.

First Third

The first third has a set of traditional Equador Connecticut shade flavors: nuts, bread, baking spices and cedar. Retrohaling opens up the baking spices and cedar more. The finish is long, with baking spices and cedar. The body is medium but is worth paying more attention to as there is considerable body and tannins. Strength is medium.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the char and pepper leave the profile returning the cigar to how it started with toasted wood and some faint baking spice. At three quarters of an inch in, some hay joins the profile while the baking spice has now become very faint. The retrohale continues to mimic the mouth draw profile with a slightly fuller version. As the third comes to a close, the cigar gains a slight effervescence to enhance the toasted wood and hay. The strength in this third bumped up to medium.

Second Third

The second third settles into a profile that is heavy on the cedar note combining with light baking spices. The cedar carries to the retrohale and has an especially long and lingering finish. Strength and body continues to be medium.

Final Third

As the final third begins, the profile is toasted wood and hay and it is becoming a bit dry. At three quarters of an inch in, a dry dirt note joins in. The retrohale shows this same profile. As the cigar wraps up, a slight char rejoins the profile. The strength in this third remained at medium.

Final Third

The final third is the same as the second third. Medium strength and bodied profile with cedar and light baking spices prevailing through mouth draws, retrohale and finish.

Burn

The burn was straight the whole way and just had an issue with going out once in the middle third. The ash held on in inch and a quarter increments.

Burn

The burn was flawless. Never a touch-up, straight burn, tight ashes and cool burning temperature throughout.

Draw

The draw was perfect with just the right amount of resistance that I prefer.

Overall

The cigar began with toasted wood and baking spice and quickly added some black pepper. As it progressed, some char joined in as the spice and pepper eased up some. Later, some hay joined in as the char dropped out, The cigar became a bit dry in the final third. The construction was very good and strength was right around medium the whole way. The Henry Clay War Hawk Toro is a pretty good Connecticut shade offering that has a good amount of body to it. I’m not often that impressed with offerings from Altadis, but this is a cigar that bucks that trend. When in the mood for a Connecticut shade, I’d have no problem with considering this cigar as one to scratch that itch. The price point is nice and this cigar brings some good value with it’s flavor offering.

Aaron
Jiunn
Very GoodPre
Light
Good
GoodFirst
Third
Good
GoodSecond ThirdAverage
AverageFinal
Third
Average
Very GoodBurnAmazing
AmazingDrawAmazing
GoodOverallAverage

Draw

The draw was also flawless giving the ideal air flow.

Overall

The experience can be summarized as a promising and great first third (special shout out to the body and tannins) followed by a mediocre cedar and light baking spice delivery within the remaining two thirds. The first third showed so much promise, providing traditional Connecticut Shade like flavors (nuts, bread, baking spices, cedar), but instead of ramping to more depth of flavors, it was the opposite, and lacked character and depth. There was perfection in burn and draw performance, but that doesn’t quite make up for the lack in total flavor experience. As such, for me, it will have to be a pass.

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

6.72

Cost/Point

$1.19

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

6.10

Cost/Point

$1.31

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Henry Clay War Hawk Toro
Aaron LoomisTeam Cigar Review: Henry Clay War Hawk Toro

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