Team Cigar Review: Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ

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Cigar Details: Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ

  • Vitola: Toro
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Nicaraguan Habano 2000
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Filler: Nicaragua
  • Factory: San Lotano
  • Blender: Hector Alfonso
  • Price: $16.50
  • Release Date: July 2019
  • Source: Espinosa

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper of the Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ is dark brown and has a couple of slightly raised veins present. The seams are fairly easily visible as the box press of the cigar has probably raised them slightly. The head is finished off with a well applied double cap. The bands have the same primary design of last years release as the secondary is tucked up under the primary but has the initials MTZ at the bottom with a baby blue background. The foot ribbon is also baby blue. The aroma from the wrapper is a mix of cocoa, earth, tobacco sweetness and white pepper. The foot brings a sweet, airy wood and light white pepper. The pre-light draw brings a lot of sweet wood with a mild spiciness on my lips.

Pre-light Experience

The Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ is nice in hand and sports a solid Natural to Natural-Maduro colored wrapper. It is silky in texture and has few visible veins. It has a nice firmness throughout and sports an aroma of sweet spices, chocolate, stone fruit and earth. The wrapper is a little bit more natural, and is earthy with some wood, tobacco and leather.

Pre-light Experience

The Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ has a firm box press and comes in at 6 inches by 52 ring gauge and named a Toro vitola, which is JMSG approved as it is exactly correct for the vitola. The band is quite striking with metallic gold accents, along with red, light blue and black. Removing the primary band reveals another band underneath indicating MTZ. The wrapper has aromas of barnyard, hay, cedar, faint spices and earth. In the foot, I pick up sweet raisin and hay.

Pre-light Experience

The Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ has a rich dark chocolate brown Colorado maduro wrapper shade. Feel and look is good as the bunch and roll is even, veins well pressed, seams tight and head finished off with a deep layered cap. Aromas from the wrapper tell cedar, hay and baking spices. Aromas from the foot give spicy cedar and roasted nuts. Cold draw gives fairly aggressive white pepper and light notes of nuttiness.

First Third

The cigar begins with wood, an intense baking spice and light creaminess. At the half inch mark, the baking spice has settled down which makes the profile much more balanced. At an inch in, the profile has creamy wood up front with a mild baking spice in the background. The retrohale has the wood, cream and baking spice at equal levels. As the third comes to a close, the creaminess has morphed into a borderline creaminess/mustiness component. The strength in this third was slightly below medium.

First Third

The first third starts out with some nice spices and I am getting bits of red pepper and cinnamon. There is a nuttiness present with the cigar and the finish is fairly earthy with some creamy aspects. I would classify the cigar as being medium-full in strength and body, and the flavors are paired perfectly with the body and strength.

First Third

My first few puffs bring flavors of pepper and sweet hay, with an intense creamy pepper on the retrohale. The pepper lingers on the post draw at the back of my throat, along with a creamy cedar. Faint powdered cocoa develops minutes later on the middle of the profile. The pepper starts to come through on the middle and front of my tongue. Once the cigar has settled in, stone fruit citrus is present under spices on the retrohale, and later some mild graham cracker. By the halfway point, some mild post draw earthiness develops, as the post draw cedar intensifies. I rated the first third as good. The flavors here were varied and none of the flavors seemed unbalanced or significantly stronger than any other.

First Third

The first third is quintessential Espinosa. The profile immediately starts off with a hit of red pepper spice pop. Roughly half an inch or so, I wouldn’t say there is necessarily less spice influence but more so some of the softer notes, mainly in a rich roasted nuttiness. Retrohaling brings the red pepper spice and rich nuttiness into greater focus. The finish is fairly long with a lasting cedar and red pepper mix. Strength is medium plus off the bat and body medium.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the mustiness has won in the battle with creaminess and has the lead in the profile over the wood and baking spice. At a quarter inch in, a toasted note joins the wood. At an inch in, some dry earthiness has joined the profile. The retrohale carries the toasted wood, mustiness and dry earthiness at equal levels. As the third comes to a close, the dry earthiness is up front with the toasted and musty wood right behind. There is still a slight baking spice in the background. The strength in this third bumped up to medium.

Second Third

When I get into the second third of the cigar, I find some transitioning and it is showing some softer spice notes with a focus on white pepper. There is a core tobacco flavor profile present, and it has this Brazilian nut with cream flavor that is pairing well with some notes of coffee beans. It’s enjoyable and like the first third, the cigar is a consistent medium-full for strength, body and flavors.

Second Third

The retrohale evolves to cocoa and graham cracker, with sweet cedar on the middle of the profile, and sweet cedar leading into the post draw. Some background citrus is present on the retrohale, and malty sweetness comes through as it settles in. By the halfway point, some honey sweetness comes into the retrohale. The second third I also rated as good, and the flavor profile was more dessert like than the first third.

Second Third

Smoking through the second third creates the same profile as the first third, but I find the rich nuttiness is more easily identified as roasted chestnuts. The profile is still very much so equal parts red pepper spice and roasted nuttiness. Strength and body is unchanged at medium plus and medium.

Final Third

The final third continues on with the dry earth, toasted wood and mustiness. The baking spice is no longer detectable. At a half inch in, some char joins the profile, knocking out the toast note. The retrohale now consists of charred wood and mustiness with a light dry earthiness. The cigar wraps up with the profile of charred wood, mustiness and light earth. The strength in this third bumped up to slightly above medium.

Final Third

The final third shows a decline overall in the flavors produced and I am getting some herbal and mineral notes with some dry earth, wood and leather qualities. It has lost the complexity from the second third, and declined even more from the first. Again, the strength and body are at a medium-full level, and the same goes for the flavors.

Final Third

The retrohale here is a rich combination of baking spices, cedar and honey sweetness. There is some trailing pepper at the end of each draw, along with some citrus in the middle of the flavor profile. The last third didn’t have as many flavor changes as the first or second third, but again was quite balanced and enjoyable.

Final Third

Some harshness comes through within the latter portion of the final third, which throws off that great mix of red pepper spice and rich nuttiness. Strength and body finishes medium plus and medium.

Burn

The burn was slightly wavy throughout but never needed any attention. The ash held on in one inch increments.

Burn

The burn was good throughout the cigar. It had its moments where it was a little wavy, but I never really had to touch-up and it never presented any problems.

Burn

The burn was straight but became uneven in the bottom half of the second third. That burn eventually resulted in the cigar going out, requiring a re-light.There were no other issues through the smoking experience.

Burn

Burn performance was very good. Fairly straight burn, tight ashes and cool burn. The only minus was some minor touch-ups required.

Draw

The draw was slightly tighter than I prefer but didn’t cause any issues with the smoking experience.

Overall

The cigar began with wood, intense baking spice and cream and the baking spice mellowed fairly quickly. The cream transitioned to mustiness and some dry earth joined in as the wood gained a toasted note. It wrapped up with charred wood, mustiness and light earth. Construction was pretty good and need no attention. Overall, the Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ was fairly average after the cream and baking spice faded away. Comparing this to the LHB, I prefer the LHB. The price point is fairly high and would be a bit of a deterrent for me to revisit the cigar. It’s worth a try to see what you think about it.

Draw

As for the draw, I would have liked to see some more resistance. I felt that it was a little loose for my liking and a tighter draw would have helped in improving the smoking experience.

Overall

Overall, the Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ is a decent cigar, but I felt it lacked some complexities in the flavor department. I loved where the body and strength were with the cigar, but the flavor department was not quite there. It had a solid start, a good foundation to grow upon, but as the cigar progressed it continuously declined. It is not a bad blend, and far from a bad Nicaraguan puro, but I felt that Espinosa could have produced a superior blend and a much better Nicaraguan puro out of La Zona. I do like the nutty and creamy aspect with the cigar, and they go well with the earthiness and pepper, but the cigar really needs more to elevate itself in being a good cigar.

Draw

The draw had roughly one notch of resistance, but still what I would consider an ideal draw.

Overall

The Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ was a good smoking experience with a wide range of flavors from pepper, sweet hay, graham cracker, powdered cocoa, citrus, earth, toasted barbecue, malty sweetness, baking spices, cedar and honey sweetness. The profile is well balanced at medium strength throughout. I found the overall smoking experience to be faster than expected, at 1 hour and 34 minutes.

Draw

The draw was perfect. No complaints here.

Overall

Cigar enthusiasts familiar with the Espinosa flavor wheelhouse will no doubt like the Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ. What I mean by that is if you are used to that spicier and bolder kick of red pepper spice but also enjoy the creamier sweeter balance of rich roasted nuttiness, you found another Espinosa cigar to put on your list. The only downside is the final third’s hint of harshness in which a few more months will hopefully remedy.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
Very GoodPre
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Aaron Loomis

SCORE

5.85

Cost/Point

$2.82

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

5.45

Cost/Point

$3.03

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

7.07

Cost/Point

$2.33

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

6.72

Cost/Point

$2.46

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ
John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: Espinosa Las 6 Provincias MTZ

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