Team Cigar Review: Davidoff Revery Toro

No comments

Cigar Details: Davidoff Revery Toro

  • Vitola: Toro
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Dominican Republic
  • Wrapper: Ecuador
  • Binder: Dominican Republic
  • Filler: Dominican Republic
  • Factory: Davidoff
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $30.00
  • Release Date: February 2019
  • Source: Havana Phil’s

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper is medium brown and has a bit of lighter marbling to it. There are a couple of slightly raised veins present and the seams, while smooth, are easily visible due to the color variation of the wrapper. The head is finished off with a well applied triple cap. There are two bands with the primary being the traditional company design and the secondary strip band carrying the line name. The aroma from the wrapper is a sweet barnyard while the foot brings stone fruit sweetness. The pre-light draw brings a bit of golden raisin along with a slightly spicy cedar where the spice transfers to the lips.

Pre-light Experience

The Davidoff Revery Toro has a strong aroma and it is showing some rich earth and barnyard on the foot. There are some peppery spice qualities with some stone fruit and chocolate, and it caught my attention right away! The wrapper is showing qualities of roasted nuts, seasoned wood and rich earth. In terms of appearance, the cigar has a nice dark Colorado Maduro coloring and it has a nice soft gritty texture. There are some small veins present and the cigar is firm in hand.

Pre-light Experience

The Davidoff Revery Toro has a primary and secondary band. The primary band is the classic Davidoff gold on white. The secondary band is black on white indicating ‘Revery’. The wrapper is a Colorado color and reminds me of the Yamasa wrapper. Nosing the cigar, I picked up aromas of spices, cedar, mustiness and tobacco. In the foot, there was a very defined sweet raisin and tobacco.

Pre-light Experience

The Davidoff Revery Toro is a true Toro sized cigar providing a light roast coffee bean brown wrapper. Construction looks and feels great as veins are neatly pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even with no soft spots and head finished off with a deep triple cap. Aromas from the wrapper tell dry red pepper, cedar and dry barnyard. Aromas from the foot give a hint of black pepper and strong hay. Cold draw gives cedar shavings and hay.

First Third

The Revery begins with an airy wood note along with a very mild black pepper. At a half inch in, the pepper has built up a bit as a creaminess has joined in with it while the wood is not so airy now, but still up front. At an inch in, the creaminess has morphed to mustiness. The retrohale carries a mixture of wood, mushroom mustiness and a faint black pepper. As the third comes to a close, the wood, mushroom mustiness and black pepper are all at equal levels. The strength in this third is slightly below medium.

First Third

The first third begins by delivering some toasted nut qualities and it is focusing on cashews and almonds. There is some black coffee present and on top of that is some black pepper. There is a sharp ginger finish to the cigar, which is unique and really adds something to the flavor profile. I would classify the cigar as being medium in strength, but the body is fairly full.

First Third

The first third begins with rich baking spices, wood and pepper that sits on the tip of my tongue. There is a delayed sweetness and baking spices hitting the sides of my tongue. As the cigar progresses, I get a musty mushroom down the center of my tongue. The cigar finishes with a clean sweet cedar through the retrohale, which carries with the baking spices from the tip of the tongue back. As the cigar settles in, the musty mushroom lingers on the post draw, and the cedar starts to drive the profile from the beginning of each draw. At the 30 minute mark, faint chocolate is detectable, but being overwhelmed by all the other flavors, with toasted cedar on the post draw. Through the bottom half of the first third, the baking spices take over the front of the palate.

First Third

The first third starts with classic Davidoff style of hay and cedar. About an inch in the profile opens. At this point, additional flavors of toast, fresh cracked black pepper, roasted chestnuts and subtle baking spices. Retrohaling gives a lot more spice than I thought it would (black pepper) and also gives more of the toast character. The finish is fairly long with cedar and a black pepper note on the rear palate. Strength is near medium-full and body is medium.

Second Third

The second third has the mushroom mustiness slightly ahead of the wood and black pepper. At an inch in, the mustiness and wood are even up front with the pepper slightly behind. The retrohale has all of the components at equal levels. At an inch and a half, a slight char joins the profile. As the third comes to a close, the charred wood and mustiness are at equal levels while the pepper is quite faint. The strength in this third has bumped up to medium.

Second Third

I am in the second third of the cigar now and finding the profile to show some transitioning which has been enjoyable. There are some salted wood notes and with that is some tobacco sweetness, black coffee and leather. The strength has picked up to a medium to medium-full level, and the body is right there as well. A nice second third.

Second Third

Baking spices have settled into medium strength with savory cedar following. The faint chocolate from the first third moves into the middle of the draw and up to light plus strength. As the second third settles in, I’m surprised how much strength this Davidoff has, compared to many other Davidoff’s I’ve reviewed. The cedar on the post draw has a drying component to the mouthfeel.

Second Third

The second third lends way to showing more of the spice and wood notes (hay, cedar, freshly cracked black pepper, baking spices). It also shows less of the nuttier notes such as the roasted chestnuts if any at all. The retrohale is the best part as it provides the same increase in black pepper, toast and now a creamed cherry note. The finish is no longer on the rear palate but is still a mix of black pepper and cedar. Strength is medium-full and body is medium.

Final Third

As the final third begins, the charred wood and mushroom mustiness remain even as the black pepper is very faint. At a half inch in, the char picks up a bit. At an inch in, the retrohale is primarily charred wood with a slight mustiness behind it. As the cigar comes to a close, it begins to warm up a bit and brings a mintiness to the profile. The strength remained at medium.

Final Third

I am in the final third now and finding another change in profile and some positive transitioning. There are some dark chocolate notes and with that is some leather, espresso and dark oak flavors. It it smoking at a medium-full level in terms of body and strength and it has a nice finish.

Final Third

Spicy cedar carries the profile into the final third. The post draw becomes toasted earth as the cigar settles in. At the halfway point, the toasted earth falls away.

Final Third

The last third continues to reach more depth in spice (black pepper, baking spices) and wood (cedar). The finish especially has a pronounced freshly cracked black pepper spice to it. Strength and body finishes medium-full and medium, respectively.

Burn

The burn was slightly wavy and required two re-lights, one each in the second and final thirds. The ash held on in inch and a quarter increments.

Burn

The Revery has a solid burn line from start to finish. The ash produced has a nice dark charcoal color and it is holding on firmly. In terms of construction, a well constructed cigar.

Burn

The first third is slightly wavy, and then corrects. The burn is very straight through the entire smoking experience. Ash holds on up to 2 inches.

Burn

The constant burn issues with the cigar was a vast disappointment. I lost count the number of touch-ups required due to roughly half the cigar not burning correctly. Unfortunately, this caused the flavor profile to change/not being able to fully appreciate the wrapper flavors.

Draw

The draw was perfect with just the right amount of resistance that I prefer.

Overall

The cigar began with airy wood, cream and black pepper and some mushroom mustiness joined in fairly quickly. This profile maintained itself until some char joined in the second third and that char increased in the final third. Other than a couple of re-lights, construction was good. The cigar had a nice start with that signature Davidoff mustiness, but it became fairly mundane as there wasn’t much change to the profile. The final third was much the same other than some increased char. This takes me back to some of the White Labels I’ve smoked previously, but even with those, it was a profile that I only enjoy in small bursts and not an entire cigar. Probably not something I’ll return to frequently, but if this is the Davidoff profile you enjoy, then this cigar would be a good choice.

Draw

The draw on the cigar is fantastic and exactly what I look for in a cigar. There is a snugness present on the cigar which is very enjoyable and again, no complaints on my end.

Overall

The Davidoff Revery Toro is a dark profile cigar and really full in body. It may not be as full body as some other blends from other companies, but for Davidoff it is intense. I feel the cigar grew as it advanced, and the final third was truly enjoyable. It is not my favorite Vault Series release, but I can see it doing well with those that are looking for a fuller body and strength Davidoff. It is up there with the new Chef and limited edition Winston Churchill. Revery is a complex flavor profile offering with some nice transitioning from start to finish.

Draw

The draw is perfect, right in the ideal zone of resistance.

Overall

The Davidoff Revery Toro offers a complex array of flavors. Baking spices, cedar, mushroom, chocolate and toasted earth. The construction is perfect, and so is the draw, but it’s what you would expect in a cigar from Davidoff. The strength reaches just over medium at the halfway mark, which I wasn’t expecting. A consistent experience from start to finish, I wouldn’t hesitate to light up another Davidoff Revery if I had the opportunity.

Draw

The draw on the other hand was the polar opposite; perfect.

Overall

Price discussion aside, I’ve never had a Davidoff cigar I did not find enjoyable. In the case of the Revery, it was no exception. The flavor profile was good (hay, cedar, toast, baking spices, fresh cracked black pepper, etc). Although good, there are some elements of greatness that I didn’t find and was searching for. Namely, sweetness and consistent fruit notes. The wrapper burn issues no doubt affected the overall flavor profile. With especially the high price of $30 MSRP, I have a hard time getting behind this one.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
Very GoodPre
Light
Good
GoodFirst
Third
AverageFirst
Third
GoodFirst
Third
Good
AverageSecond
Third
GoodSecond
Third
GoodSecond
Third
Good
AverageFinal
Third
GoodFinal
Third
GoodFinal
Third
Good
AverageBurnVery GoodBurnAmazingBurnSubpar
AmazingDrawVery GoodDrawAmazingDrawAmazing
AverageOverallGoodOverallGoodOverallGood

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

5.80

Cost/Point

$5.17

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

6.57

Cost/Point

$4.57

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

7.17

Cost/Point

$4.19

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

6.77

Cost/Point

$4.43

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Davidoff Revery Toro
John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: Davidoff Revery Toro

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *