Team Cigar Review: Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro

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Cigar Details: Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro

  • Vitola: Toro
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Pennsylvania Broadleaf
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Filler: Nicaragua
  • Factory: La Zona
  • Blender: Hector Alfonso
  • Price: $11.95
  • Release Date: July 2019
  • Source: Cubariqueño

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper on the Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro is medium brown with some darker marbling. There are some slightly raised veins present and the seams are well blended but visible in some spots due to the color variation. The head is finished with a well applied triple cap. The cigar has three bands with the primary being two bands together which is the same design and color combination as the Natural version in the line. The foot has a burgundy ribbon which is what differentiates this as the Maduro. The aroma from the wrapper is an earth and hay forward barnyard while the foot brings a clay earthiness and some wood. The pre-light draw brings cedar and light raisin with a mild spiciness on my lips.

Pre-light Experience

The Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro has a wrapper that is soft in texture, but the cigar itself is quite firm. The veins present are quite noticeable and it has a nice solid maduro coloring, really dark earth vibe present. The aromas on the cigar are that of red meat, chocolate, spices, soft red pepper and adobe, and it’s rich and filling.

Pre-light Experience

Like the Natural, the Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro has a fairly firm box press or square press with a band that features a number of complicated elements, and a secondary band underneath, along with a red foot band for the Maduro version. The band has the same styling of gold accents, with an image of Sir Robert Peel. Nosing the wrapper, I’m able to pick up aromas of cedar and spices and nothing else from the foot.

Pre-light Experience

The Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro has a nice mix between Colorado maduro and red wrapper shade. Veins are well pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even with a good give and head wrapped well. Aromas from the wrapper give very pungent wet barnyard and cedar. Aromas from the foot give jammy plums, rich roasted nuttiness and cedar. Cold draw tells dried persimmons, cedar and hay.

First Third

The cigar begins with wood, spicy cinnamon and a light mustiness. At a half inch in, the depth of the wood is very nice. The mustiness has increased which has mellowed the cinnamon a bit. At an inch in, a slight cocoa note joins the profile while the cinnamon is now a light baking spice. The retrohale is wood, cocoa, mustiness and light baking spice.At an inch and half in, the cocoa has left as the baking spice has increased to be just behind the wood and in front of the mustiness. The strength in this third was right at medium.

First Third

The first third begins by delivering some rich earth and dry cocoa powder notes that are followed with some spices, leather and dry wood. I would classify the cigar as being around the medium-full level, and that is for body, strength and flavors.

First Third

My first few puffs bring flavors of mild, creamy cedar with hints of pepper to finish. Baking spices, creaminess and cedar are present on the retrohale. On the post draw, pepper settles in and intensifies rapidly. Lingering cedar joins minutes later. As the first third establishes, light, mid palate cocoa comes in, and post draw leather joins soon after. The pepper from the post draw begins to move into the retrohale at light plus. At the halfway point, orange citrus sits under the cocoa at a light plus strength. Creamy cedar also joins to add significant amounts of complexity. On another of the SRP’s smoked, there was more defined creamy chocolate, along with lingering sweetness on the post draw.

First Third

The first third gives an equally robust spicy and sweet creamy combination. There’s a red pepper spice that lays heavy on the palate and gives a fierce retrohale. With that, there’s also a nice rich roasted nuttiness. The finish has the red pepper spice that lingers seemingly forever (ie from draw to draw). Strength is medium-full and body medium.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the mustiness picks up to become even with the wood while the baking spice is not far behind. At a half inch in, a grassy note joins in and pairs up with the mustiness. At three quarters of an inch in, the grassy note leaves as the wood gains a light toastiness. The retrohale is the lightly toasted wood and mustiness. At an inch and a quarter, a light grassiness rejoins the profile. As the third comes to a close, char replaces the toastiness. The strength in this third bumped up to slightly above medium.

Second Third

When I enter into the second third of the cigar, I am picking up a lot of those core flavors from the first third, rich earth, dry cocoa powder, pepper and spices, but it is complimented with some leather, coffee, cream and wood notes. The cigar is still smoking at that medium-full level for strength, body and flavors, and it is a nice maduro offering.

Second Third

Moving into the second third, toasted cedar and creaminess on the retrohale. The post draw takes on baking spices, along with cedar that combines well. Mild cocoa on the retrohale and as the cigar continues to progress, post draw leather at light plus. Those leather notes take on some tannins which find their way up to medium by the halfway point. The second third was consistent across all the Sir Robert Peel Maduros that I smoked.

Second Third

The second third’s profile turns darker. The red pepper spice level is still very much the same. But what has changed is the lack of the rich roasted nuttiness. This is replaced by a rustic black coffee note. Further, the strength has ramped again from medium-full to full. Body remains medium.

Final Third

As the final third begins, the profile is charred wood and mustiness with a light grassiness. At a half inch in, the mustiness increases and has a slight lead over the charred wood. The retrohale is mustiness with a light charred wood. At an inch and a quarter, a slight mintiness and a vegetal note join the profile. The cigar wraps up with the mustiness up front, charred wood slightly behind and some mintiness and vegetal notes in the background. The strength in this third remained at slightly above medium.

Final Third

As I enter into the final third of the cigar, I find a lot of the same profiles to be present that were present from the get go. I am getting those rich earth notes with some dry cocoa powder, pepper and spices. The leather notes remain and the finish is of coffee and cream. Like before, the cigar is smoking at a level between medium and medium-full.

Final Third

Leather and cedar drive the flavor profile moving into the last third. Cocoa is still present on the middle of the profile, along with post draw leather. That post draw leather pushes into the middle of the profile as the cigar progresses. Once the last third has established itself, citrus returns to the middle of the profile as well. In one of the other cigars smoked, the citrus joined earlier in the last third.

Final Third

The darkness especially represented within the second third continues to the final third. But this time around, the profile takes a downturn such that there’s less flavors. The only flavor is the endless long and lingering red pepper spice. Strength and body finishes full and medium.

Burn

The burn line was a bit wavy throughout and the cigar went out three times requiring re-lights. Between the re-lights, the ash held on in inch and a half increments.

Burn

The burn was uneven throughout the entire smoking experience and required quite a bit of touch-ups. It was particularly bad in the first third and slightly improved throughout. With that being said, I had to re-light the cigar on numerous occasions.

Burn

The burn was relatively straight throughout the smoking experience, with no touch-ups or re-lights required. The ash held on well up to 2 inches at times.

Burn

Aside from a couple quick touch-ups, the burn was perfect. Solid ash marks, plenty of smoke production and cool burning temperature.

Draw

The draw was slightly tighter than I prefer but didn’t seem to cause any issues with the smoking experience.

Overall

The cigar started out well in the first third with wood, cinnamon and mustiness, but by the second third, it lost the nice complexity and was settled around some toasted wood and mustiness. Some char joined in later and held that way as some grassiness joined in and then later mintiness and vegetal notes. The burn was a struggle with multiple re-lights and other times that the smoke got light and required frequent draws to keep things going. I really wish the Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro had kept up with what the first third was offering as I really enjoyed it. It just went downhill after that which was a shame. With smoking both the Maduro and Natural offerings, I’m a bit disappointed in this line. I won’t be in a hurry to smoke either and my preference would be to just go back to smoking the previous core lines from the brand.

Draw

From start to finish, the draw was not a major problem. I found that at times it was loose, others tight, but it came in waves and never created a major problem, just a nuisance.

Overall

I was not blown away by the Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro and I believe it to be the weaker of the two releases. You can pick up on the PA Broadleaf flavors present with the wrapper, but it was not as enjoyable as I was hoping. It has been some time since I smoked a good PA Broadleaf release, and I wonder if it is struggling as a crop like CT Broadleaf. The rich earth and dry cocoa powder notes were enjoyable, and made for a nice maduro offering, but I was hoping for more from the cigar. This comes off as a premium release for Protocol/Cubariqueño, but I am not finding that to be the case.

Draw

The draw was right in the ideal zone of resistance. Normally I would expect a box pressed cigar to be well into the open spectrum.

Overall

I think the company has released a balanced and nuanced Limited Edition with the Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro. The packaging is fitting of a limited release, and while the flavor profile is more reduced in intensity from their regular production cigars, I feel like it’s the type of blend you want to showcase in this way. The construction and burn were both flawless, and the total smoking time was just shy of two hours at 1 hour and 50 minutes smoking time. I never found the strength to be above medium-full and should be approachable for the majority of cigar smokers.

Draw

The draw had zero issues as it gave the ideal air flow.

Overall

An overall good offering from Cubariqueño, in which at this point I expect given the solid releases from previous years. What I didn’t expect was how dark, spicy and full (strength) it would be. It didn’t take long for the cigar to ramp from medium-full to full. Also, the quintessential spice punch La Zona is typically known for never seemed to end with the cigar. Not my wheelhouse but I can respect it. The Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro is a good cigar for a post big meal, and one that will pair well with cask strength spirits. Also, it’s quite different from other Cubariqueño offerings as no other ones in the portfolio match to this level of fullness in strength and darkness in flavors. Like I said, not my wheelhouse but still solid.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
Very GoodPre
Light
AveragePre
Light
Very GoodPre
Light
Very Good
GoodFirst
Third
AverageFirst
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GoodFirst
Third
Good
AverageSecond
Third
AverageSecond
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GoodSecond
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Good
SubparFinal
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AverageFinal
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GoodFinal
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Average
SubparBurnSubparBurnAmazingBurnVery Good
Very GoodDrawAverageDrawAmazingDrawAmazing
AverageOverallAverageOverallGoodOverallGood

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

5.20

Cost/Point

$2.30

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

4.90

Cost/Point

$2.44

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

7.17

Cost/Point

$1.67

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

6.72

Cost/Point

$1.78

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro
John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: Cubariqueño Protocol Sir Robert Peel Maduro

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