Team Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto

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Cigar Details: Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto

  • Vitola: Robusto
  • Length: 4.75″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Mexican San Andrés
  • Binder: Ecuadorian Sumatra
  • Filler: Nicaragua and Dominican Republic
  • Factory: Tabacalera Pichardo
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $5.95
  • Release Date: December 2018
  • Source: Crowned Heads

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper on the Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto is medium brown and has a few slightly raised veins present. The seams are smooth but easily visible due to the thickness of the wrapper. The head is finished off with a slightly wrinkled double cap. The band is fairly simple being off-white and black, showing a bull with a crown and the line name. The aroma from the wrapper is a mix of wood and easily identifiable cherry sweetness. The foot has the same two aromas with some earthiness mixed in to the middle of them. The pre-light draw brings cedar with a mild spice that is also present on my lips.

Pre-light Experience

The Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto has a natural espresso bean medium brown to the wrapper shade. Bunch and roll is uniformed, veins well pressed, seams tight and head finished off with a deep triple cap. Wrapper aromas tell cedar and minerals. Aromas from the foot tell cedar, hay and leather. Cold draw gives aged wood, hay and cedar.

First Third

The cigar begins with dry wood, earthiness and some baking spice. At a quarter inch in, a slight spice that carries some heat to it joins the profile and replaces the baking spice. At three quarters of an inch in, the spice has faded back and is very faint while the wood and earthiness are even up front. The retrohale presents the even mixture of wood and earthiness. As the third comes to a close, a bit of nuttiness joins the profile. The strength in this third was right at medium.

First Third

Beginning handful of draws brings a barnyard must/funk. Getting into the cigar a bit more, a mixture of spicy cedar on the tip of the tongue and a nice creamed sweetness joins the profile. Retrohaling gives a bigger spicy cedar as well as a back end creamed sweetness. The finish is a mixture of natural creamed nuttiness and lingering red pepper heat on the rear palate. Strength and body is medium.

Second Third

As the second third begins, a slight creaminess joins the profile. At a half inch in, some char joins the wood, while the earthiness is still evenly matched up with it. Still a bit of cream in the background while the nuttiness has dropped out. At an inch in, the retrohale is just carrying a significantly charred wood. As the third comes to a close, the profile remains charred wood, earthiness and faint cream. The strength remains at medium.

Second Third

Second third has the cedar note showing up more, both through mouth draws and the finish. But the retrohale is still where it’s at with spicy cedar and creamed sweetness alike. The strength and body remains unchanged at medium.

Final Third

As the final third begins, the char begins to increase. At a half inch in, the cream is replaced by mustiness. At an inch in, the cigar begins to warm up bringing a toasted note to the wood. The retrohale consists of just the toasted wood without any char. As the cigar comes to a close, the profile is charred and toasted wood, earthiness and mustiness. The strength bumped up to slightly above medium.

Final Third

The last third has the cream, sweetness and nuttiness pretty much all gone, replacing it with minerals, spicy cedar and dirt/soil. Strength and body finishes medium.

Burn

The burn line was slightly wavy but didn’t need any attention. The ash held on in one inch increments.

Burn

The burn was perfect. Tight ashes, even burn and cool burning.

Draw

The draw was slightly tighter than I prefer but didn’t cause any issues with the smoking experience.

Overall

The Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto began with dry wood, earth and baking spice that quickly turned to a spice with some heat. As it progressed, the spice left and the wood gained some char and a little cream. The cream was later replaced by mustiness. Construction was quite good and the strength level was right around medium the whole way. The flavor profile was fairly average and didn’t provide any wow factor. The price point is attractive and if you’re fan of Mexican San Andres, it’s definitely worth a try. It probably isn’t a cigar I’d gravitate towards, but if it was handed to me, I wouldn’t turn it down.

Aaron
Jiunn
Very GoodPre
Light
Good
AverageFirst
Third
Good
AverageSecond ThirdGood
AverageFinal
Third
Average
Very GoodBurnAmazing
Very GoodDrawAmazing
AverageOverallGood

Draw

The draw was also perfect, giving the ideal air flow.

Overall

Give me a good tasting profile for two thirds of the cigar and a flawless draw and burn, all wrapped up in a ~$6 USD price point and I say you’ve got yourself a winner. I’ve had some excellent Mexican San Andrés wrapped cigars from Crowned Heads in 2018 (Court Reserve XVIII, Buckeye Land) and the Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto is really no exception. Except this should fair quite well within our price point to score ratio analysis.

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

5.50

Cost/Point

$1.08

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

6.82

Cost/Point

$0.87

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto
Jiunn LiuTeam Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Juarez Robusto

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