Team Cigar Review: Camacho Nicaragua Robusto

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Cigar Details: Camacho Nicaragua Robusto

  • Vitola: Robusto
  • Length: 5″
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Country of Origin: Honduras
  • Wrapper: Ecuador
  • Binder: Honduras
  • Filler: Nicaragua, Honduras and Dominican Republic
  • Factory: Diadema Cigars de Honduras
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $8.60
  • Release Date: July 2020
  • Source: Havana Phil’s

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Jiunn-Liu

 Jiunn Liu

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper of the Camacho Nicaragua Robusto is on the lighter side of medium brown and has some raised veins running down the back of the cigar. The seams are slightly raised and easily visible while the head is finished off with a well applied triple cap. The band is the standard design for the brand with this line carrying an orange and black color combination. The aroma from the wrapper is wood and hay while the foot brings wood and some stewed fruit sweetness. The pre-light draw brings a slightly spicy cedar along with mild spice on my lips.

Pre-light Experience

Finished with a light Colorado wrapper, the Camacho Nicaragua Robusto sports veins that are medium to large in size. It is slightly firm throughout and is producing aromas of leather, wood, coffee, bourbon and tobacco. It has this rustic quality to the cigar with a modern and sharp band that is pretty funky.

Pre-light Experience

The Camacho Nicaragua Robusto has a large orange band that’s roughly double the width of a typical band. The cigar features a light chocolate colored wrapper. For aromas, I was able to pick up sweet bread and graham cracker. I wasn’t able to pick out much in the foot, maybe sweet tobacco, but that was all.

Pre-light Experience

The Camacho Nicaragua Robusto has a shiny and oily Colorado Cafe wrapper. Veins are well pressed, seams tight, bunch and roll even and head well wrapped. Aromas from the wrapper tell intense barnyard and cedar. Aromas from the foot give spicy raw cedar and roasted nuts. Cold draw gives hay and faint cedar.

First Third

The cigar begins with cedar and a mid-level spiciness. At a half inch in, a faint mustiness joins in. The retrohale leads with cedar and then a wave of spiciness burns through my nostrils. At an inch in, some earth joins the profile. The third wraps up with cedar and spice up front, earth just behind and some mellow mustiness in the background. The strength in this third was slightly above medium.

First Third

The first third begins by delivering qualities of sweet spices, leather, tobacco, oak and bourbon. It is medium in strength and body and has a long finish. It’s an interesting profile because it has this aged and dry earth vibe.

First Third

Mild baking spices, hay and cedar to start the first third. A sharp, tannic wood moves into the post draw. A bread component mixes in with medium baking spices on the retrohale, as the cigar progresses. Sweet cocoa joins the retrohale as the first third settles in. By the 25 minute mark, the profile has settled into a balanced and creamy experience.

First Third

The first third has flavors of cedar, light sense of nuttiness and cinnamon. Retrohaling gives big flavors of cherries, white pepper spice and cedar. The finish is nearly non-existent, providing a quick hit of cedar, only to quickly vanish. Strength and body is medium.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the earth moves up to even with the cedar while the spice is now right behind them. At a half inch in, the spice is now quite mellow. The retrohale is general wood and earth with mustiness right behind and faint spiciness. The third wraps up with cedar, earth and mustiness all even with faint spice. The strength remains at slightly above medium.

Second Third

The second third delivers a profile of barnyard, tobacco, oak and bourbon, and it’s somewhat similar while completely different from the first third. Interesting transitioning while continuing to smoke at a medium level in strength and body.

Second Third

Sweet, creamy cedar takes the cigar into the second third. A light plus cedar defines the post draw. Baking spices at a medium strength join the retrohale as the second third settles in. Light plus pleather joins the post draw approaching the halfway point. Light graham cracker joins the profile as the cigar moves towards the last third.

Second Third

Not much happening in the second third to improve on the first third’s flavor profile. I’m mainly getting waves of cedar and stale dried nuts. The cinnamon spice is heavily subdued at this point. The finish does lengthen a bit, carrying over the stale nuts from the mouth draws. Strength and body remains medium.

Final Third

The final third continues on with the cedar, earth and mustiness while the spice has dropped out. At a half inch in, the cedar gains a fair amount of char as the cigar begins to warm up. The retrohale is musty wood and earth. As the third comes to a close, the char on the cedar has lightened up a bit and the earth and mustiness remained even with it. The strength in this third remained at slightly above medium.

Final Third

Like the first and second third, the cigar delivers a profile of barnyard, tobacco, oak and bourbon. There is a faint bit of sweet spices present on the finish, but the barnyard and oak qualities overpower it for the most part. Like before, medium in strength and body.

Final Third

Cream, baking spices, cedar and graham cracker offer a medley of flavors moving to the last third. Mildly tannic cedar joins the post draw as it settles. As the last third progresses, the flavor intensity falls to light as cedar becomes the primary flavor component.

Final Third

The final third has some sourness and bitterness that seeps through. But the majority of it is still the same recurring cedar and stale nuts. Retrohaling is by far the best part (as it was the first two thirds) since it’s full of good flavors. Strength and body finishes medium.

Burn

The burn line was straight the entire way and the ash held on in inch and a half increments.

Burn

Perfect burn from start to finish.

Burn

The burn was relatively straight throughout the review. Ash fell at one inch increments.

Burn

Burn performance was stellar. Even burn, tight ashes, cool burning temperature and ample smoke production

Draw

The draw was perfect, with just the right amount of resistance that I prefer.

Overall

The Camacho Nicaragua Robusto had a nice start with a good level of spice balancing the profile. As the spice mellowed in the second third and the earth played a larger role, the enjoyment level dropped to average and maintained that level the rest of the way. I was really hoping the profile in the first third would have lasted longer, but that wasn’t how things panned out. With a cigar named after Nicaragua only having Nicaraguan tobacco as a portion of the filler, it’s a bit of a head scratcher, but with the experience I had and the price point it’s offered at, I could see this cigar doing well. I probably won’t come back to this frequently, but I could see smoking this from time to time.

Draw

Draw was amazing from beginning to end.

Overall

The Camacho Nicaragua Robusto is a solid release and every vitola brings out something different in the cigar. I don’t think one vitola shines brighter than the others, and that is something I have not come across that often. It has these old school profiles of barnyard and oak, but with touches of sweet spice and bourbon as well. I would have liked for a little bit more complexity, and a little bit more Nicaraguan tobacco, but a solid blend for the brand.

Draw

The draw was perfectly in the ideal zone of resistance.

Overall

The Camacho Nicaragua Robusto showcases some of the better flavor components from Nicaraguan tobacco. Rather than overpower you with spice and pepper, the cigar offers up baking spices, creaminess and sweetness that kept me engaged throughout the review experience. I’ve been a fan of the entire Camacho line since they redid their packaging, and the latest Nicaragua Robusto release still holds up. I will still continue to smoke these when I have the opportunity. Total smoking time was 1 hour and 58 minutes.

Draw

The draw was perfect, striking the best balance between air flow and resistance.

Overall

The Camacho Nicaragua Robusto was an OK experience. It’s essentially a mundane profile with flawless construction. In a way, that’s how I feel about most Camacho releases. It needs to stop being in the lowlight of the Davidoff portfolio and get some spotlight by going back to the roots of Camacho.

Aaron
Seth
John
Jiunn
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
Good
GoodFirst
Third
AverageFirst
Third
GoodFirst
Third
Average
AverageSecond
Third
AverageSecond
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GoodSecond
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Average
AverageFinal
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AverageFinal
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AmazingBurnAmazingBurnAmazingBurnAmazing
AmazingDrawAmazingDrawAmazingDrawAmazing
AverageOverallAverageOverallGoodOverallAverage

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

6.10

Cost/Point

$1.41

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

5.75

Cost/Point

$1.50

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

6.82

Cost/Point

$1.26

Scoring System

Jiunn Liu

SCORE

5.75

Cost/Point

$1.50

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Camacho Nicaragua Robusto
John McTavishTeam Cigar Review: Camacho Nicaragua Robusto

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