Team Cigar Review: Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro

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Cigar Details: Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro

  • Vitola: Toro
  • Length: 6″
  • Ring Gauge: 50
  • Country of Origin: Honduras
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Connecticut
  • Binder: Honduran Corojo
  • Filler: Honduras and Dominican Republic
  • Factory: Diadema Cigars de Honduras
  • Blender: Undisclosed
  • Price: $9.25
  • Release Date: June 2019
  • Source: Camacho

Aaron-Loomis

 Aaron Loomis

Seth Geise

 Seth Geise

 John McTavish

Pre-light Experience

The wrapper o the Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro is medium tan with some greenish tinges in some areas and has a couple of raised veins present. The seams are easily visible due to them being slightly raised and the light wrapper color. The head is finished off with a well applied triple cap. There are two bands with the primary sporting the typical vertical design of the brand and denoting the line and wrapper with an overall black and orange color combination. The foot band is black and grey and denotes the line. The aroma from the wrapper is sweet hay while the foot brings oak and stone fruit sweetness. The pre-light draw provides a mouthful of slightly sweet and dry oak.

Pre-light Experience

The Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro is finished with a lovely Connecticut wrapper that sports few veins, small to medium in size and is silky in texture. The wrapper has a light golden hay color to it, and it is a solid Claro. The cigar is firm throughout and I am getting aromas of fruit stew, sweet spices, cedar, hay and grass on the wrapper and foot.

Pre-light Experience

As I was removing the Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro from the cellophane, I can immediately smell aromas of sweet bourbon. The cigar has a foot band, and a primary band with a number of artistic complications on it. The wrapper is quite a light shade of Connecticut Shade. For aromas, I was picking up heavy bourbon, with underlying notes of grass, hay and old barn wood. From the foot, that heavy bourbon sweetness is intensified.

First Third

The cigar begins with oak and mustiness. At a half inch in, some dry earth joins the profile. The retrohale brings a very nice toasted oak with light mustiness. At an inch in, the toasted note joins the oak. At an inch and a half, the toasted oak is up front with the mustiness slightly behind and the dry earth a little further behind. The strength in this third was slightly below medium.

First Third

The first third opens up with a sweet spice profile that is showing some cinnamon and anise. I am getting some clove qualities as well, and there is a rich earth presence as well that has some oak qualities. Of course, there is a creamy and hay aspect as well and the finish is showing some caramel qualities. I would classify the cigar as being just under medium in body and strength. Flavors are at the medium level.

First Third

Creamy, sweet hay to open the first third, as hay and cedar carries it into the post draw. Sweetness joins the post draw as the first third settles in. There’s a nice bourbon sweetness in the middle of the profile as the cigar hits the two inch mark.

Second Third

As the second third begins, the mustiness has become even with the toasted oak while the dry earth remains in the background. At a half inch in, a light black pepper joins the profile as the toasted note has left. The retrohale is musty oak, dry earth and faint black pepper. At an inch and a half in, the toasted note returns to the profile. As the third comes to a close, the toasted oak and mustiness are very full while the dry earth and black pepper are in the background. The strength in this third bumped up to medium.

Second Third

The second third shows some transitioning from the first third and the creamy qualities have taken the spotlight. It is paired with some cedar, hay and barnyard qualities, and the finish has some oak, mineral and smokiness. There is a little bit of black pepper on the finish, but it is subtle overall. Like the first third, the cigar is medium in body, strength and flavors.

Second Third

Sweet hay takes the cigar into the second third, with cedar hitting at the end of the draw, carrying into the post draw. That cedar is light strength on the post draw, and lingers between each puff. As the cigar approaches the middle of the third, cedar joins the retrohale. Dry hay with lingering dryness is present between each puff. Graham cracker joins the retrohale in the bottom half, with a finish of dry cedar and hay.

Final Third

The final third continues with the toasted oak and mustiness up front and the dry earth in the background with the black pepper very faint. The profile is a bit drying at this point. At a half inch in, some char and light bitterness join the profile. The retrohale is toasted and musty oak with dry earth. The cigar finished up with toasted oak that has a light char, mustiness and some dry earth. The strength in this third remained at medium.

Final Third

The final third shows some further transitioning and I am picking up some strong spice notes with a focus on black pepper. I am getting some mineral and barnyard qualities with that, and it is followed with some oak. The finish is showing some light cream notes, and it is paired with that cedar and grass quality from before with another finish of black pepper and salt. The cigar is just above medium in body and flavors, and I would say the strength is right at a medium level.

Final Third

Sweet hay, graham cracker and hints of cocoa take the retrohale into the last third. Dry cedar makes up the middle of the profile and lingers on the post draw. That cedar ends up taking over the flavor profile once the last third settles in.

Burn

The burn line was a bit wavy throughout and required a touch-up in the final third to keep everything burning together. The ash was a bit flaky, but it held on in inch and a half increments.

Burn

The burn was amazing throughout. The light charcoal ash held on firmly and I never had any problems that required touching up. You couldn’t ask for more from a burn.

Burn

The burn is even through the first and second thirds. The ash holds on well with a two inch ash. Cigar goes out in the last third, requiring a re-light.

Draw

The draw was perfect, with just the right amount of resistance that I prefer.

Overall

The cigar begins with oak and mustiness. Some dry earth joined in as well as a toasted note for the oak. The second third saw some black pepper join the profile. The final third gained a light char and bitterness and the profile became a bit dry. Construction was pretty good and strength was medium most of the way. The Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro had a nice profile through the first two thirds with a wonderful balance. The final third dropped a bit due to the dryness, char and bitterness. This is a pretty nice Connecticut shade offering. While I’m not sure I noticed much barrel aging, the cigar was still a joy to smoke. I’d definitely come back to this one and would recommend it to fans of Connecticut Shade or anyone that likes an oak focused flavor profile.

Draw

The draw was fantastic from the beginning to end. This was a well constructed cigar.

Overall

I am not going to lie, it has been a while since I smoked a Camacho Connecticut. With that being said, the Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro is a superior blend to the original Camacho Connecticut. The tobacco that was aged in barrels brought more life to the cigar and added some complexity to the overall blend. It is still approachable for those looking to smoke a Connecticut, but it has more overall flavors which is great for a seasoned smoker. The cigar really has a great beginning, and it continues to smoke well to the end. I was pleasantly surprised by the blend and would definitely pick these up again in the future. Solid cigar and a positive addition for Camacho.

Draw

The draw has a significant amount of resistance to it, roughly 3 to 3-1/2 notches.

Overall

The Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro represents the flavor profile and aromas I expect when a cigar features barrel aging. If you were to just read through the flavor notes you might be surprised to find a short list. However, I found the blend to be a good representation of a Connecticut Shade, with the barrel aging adding a nice bourbon sweetness that was detectable, but in no way overshadowed the general profile. Total smoking time was 2 hours and 4 minutes.

Aaron
Seth
John
GoodPre
Light
GoodPre
Light
Very Good
GoodFirst
Third
Very GoodFirst
Third
Good
GoodSecond ThirdGoodSecond ThirdGood
AverageFinal
Third
GoodFinal
Third
Average
GoodBurnAmazingBurnVery Good
AmazingDrawVery GoodDrawAverage
GoodOverallGoodOverallGood

Aaron Loomis

SCORE

6.62

Cost/Point

$1.40

Scoring System

Seth Geise

SCORE

7.37

Cost/Point

$1.26

Scoring System

John McTavish

SCORE

6.27

Cost/Point

$1.48

Scoring System

Team Cigar Review: Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro
Seth GeiseTeam Cigar Review: Camacho Distillery Edition Connecticut Toro

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